Helping Teens and Families Live Happier Lives

teenage girl hunches over and cries with the title "sad and overwhelmed"
teenage boy smoking a joint with the title "unmotivated and disinterested"
teenage girl perfectionist looks insecure and holds sign reading "me 4 class prez."
teenage girl in despair about dropped notebook "overcome by trauma.'
angry teenage boy in baseball cap with title "angry and belligerent."
boy in hoodie using tablet: "shy and withdrawn."

Helping Teens and Families Live Happier Lives

teenage girl hunches over and cries with the title "sad and overwhelmed"
teenage boy smoking a joint with the title "unmotivated and disinterested"
teenage girl in despair about dropped notebook "overcome by trauma.'
angry teenage boy in baseball cap with title "angry and belligerent."
teenage girl perfectionist looks insecure and holds sign reading "me 4 class prez."
boy in hoodie using tablet: "shy and withdrawn."

Helping Teens and Families Live Happier Lives

teenage girl hunches over and cries with the title "sad and overwhelmed"
teenage boy smoking a joint with the title "unmotivated and disinterested"
teenage girl in despair about dropped notebook "overcome by trauma.'
angry teenage boy in baseball cap with title "angry and belligerent."
teenage girl perfectionist looks insecure and holds sign reading "me 4 class prez."
boy in hoodie using tablet: "shy and withdrawn."

Helping Teens and Families Live Happier Lives

Welcome to Teen Therapy Center. My name is Kent Toussaint. I'm the founder and clinical director.
We are a group private practice here in Woodland Hills, California. We are filled with therapists
who are fun loving, professional, warm, and we specialize in helping kids, teens and families
live happier lives. And we do that because we speak teenager and we speak parent. And we are often
the interpreter in between the two to help bridge those gaps to make sure that teenagers are
finally understanding parents, parents are understanding teenagers. And we're helping
develop greater communication, better empathy, healthier boundaries within the family.
But when we understand a kid or a teenager, we also have to understand what it's like to be a little
kid and a young adult and a parent. Because when you're a teenager, you're in this amazing transition
period where you got 1 foot as a kid and 1 foot in the adult world. And it's confusing and it's frustrating.
You know, I know we've been teenagers. Your teenagers

are going through it for their very first time. And so my job, or our job as therapists is to help
them go through that. We do that through individual therapy, family therapy, and sometimes
group therapy, depending on what your kids needs are. There are a variety of issues we deal with,
obviously. Self esteem issues, school motivation, anxiety, depression, attention issues,
autism spectrum, anyone who identifies multi, exceptional or two E. We work with those people
every day. Kids who are their families are going through divorces or even sometimes when they're
blending families together. Those can be very nuanced, complicated issues. And sometimes
having a therapist to help bridge the gap, help increase and develop better communication
is really helpful. Thanks for stopping by. Please check out our website. Give us a call. We're
happy to provide a complimentary phone consultation so you can ask all your questions. We can
provide you the answers so you feel comfortable choosing us. And

if somehow what you're asking for is outside of our scope, we're happy to provide you other resources
so you can find the referrals you need to get the help you need for you and your family. Thanks
again. My name is Kenta Tussant. This is Teen Therapy Center, and we look forward to talking
to you soon.

Welcome to Teen Therapy Center!

The mission of Teen Therapy Center is to help children, teens and families live happier lives. We’re good at it too! We speak both “teen” and “parent” which helps us break down barriers to communication. Our staff is a group of fun loving professionals from a variety of backgrounds. You can meet them here.

Teen Therapy Center offers individual, family and group therapy. We’re happy to offer a free consultation to see if we’re the right fit for you. If not, we can still help guide you to the support you need. Get in touch at (818) 697-8555, we’d love to hear from you!

Online and Phone Sessions Available!

Teen Therapy Center is offering virtual therapy through platforms like Zoom, FaceTime, or via phone call. Whether you attend session in-person or from home, our therapists remain committed to providing a high level of care, compassion, and support for you and your family.

Online and Phone Sessions Available!

Teen Therapy Center is offering virtual therapy through platforms like Zoom, FaceTime, or via phone call. Whether you attend session in-person or from home, our therapists remain committed to providing a high level of care, compassion, and support for you and your family.

Our Latest "Tips on Teens" Video

Tips on Teens is our weekly segment on Facebook Live where Kent Toussaint answers your parenting questions. We cover a wide range of topics affecting teens and their families. We’ve archived all the videos right here on the site. 

Click below to search our library of Tips on Teens videos for answers to your questions. As always, we love to hear your questions. Send them to us here.


Is your teenager's screen time out of control? Well, let's talk about that today on Tips on Teens.
My name is Kent Toussaint. I'm a licensed marriage and family therapist, and I specialize in
helping kids, teens, and families to live happier lives. I lead two organizations, Teen Therapy
Center and the nonprofit 501c3 organization, Child and Teen Counseling, both here in Woodland
Hills, California. And every Wednesday at noon, I jump onto Facebook Live to answer your parenting
questions. Let's answer today's. My son is 13 and his screen time is getting out of control.
It wasn't really a problem for us until recently. We got him his own Chromebook a few months ago
because the school one wouldn't allow him to play Minecraft with his cousin remotely. Unfortunately,
it opened a Pandora's box. We are arguing with him about how much time he spends on the screen,
and last week, we caught him up at midnight watching YouTube. How do we establish some new rules
and clean up this mess? Thank you for

your question. I think this question, almost every one of my families I work with deals with
this in one way or another. We have to understand that at 13, he has a developing teenage brain,
which means he doesn't have a fully developed adult brain yet. So his prefrontal cortex, the
executive functioning part of the brain, is underdeveloped. It's not his fault. he's 13. But
things like impulse control, emotional regulation, the ability to see cause and effect is
impaired in him as opposed to an adult. So we have to understand that we can't expect him to act
and be mature in his decision -making. He's 13. So oftentimes what I see works is getting one
of these apps that you pay a monthly service or a yearly subscription where you put it on your
phone and on his computer and you can regulate how much time is spent on there, what apps, what
websites, things of that nature, what content you can have. None of them are perfect. Several
more pretty good. Go out and do your research, figure out which

one's best for you. Be prepared that you may have to get on the phone with customer service, figure
out why it's not working with the way you thought it was. Also, the problem is if you're going
to do a computer update, if you have not done a computer update, it might stop working. So you
may have to go and double check that Chromebook or laptop, whatever computer you're using,
to make sure that it's still working and workable. And what this does is it takes the it removes
you have from having to be the prison warden, we're always looking to see if you can catch up,
which makes you nervous makes him nervous doesn't help anybody. So but if you can have the program
set the time of Hey, he has access to Minecraft from time x to time y. And that's it, then you don't
worry about him doing it later on. If you know that YouTube is shut off at a certain time, you know
he won't be on a midnight on YouTube. You can shut off the whole computer that has no Wi -Fi access
for, you know, from whatever

time he's supposed to go to bed until he gets up in the morning. So you don't have to worry about
him being on there. None of them are perfect, again, but these help because it helps reduce some
of these arguments. Now, he may still get frustrated. He may still get mad and say, hey, all my
friends are online, I can't be online, it's not fair. And you may have to help him, guide him towards
other activities, family board game night, making cookies together, taking the dog for a walk,
shooting hoops in the front yard, whatever that is, you may have to help guide him because he
doesn't know how to self soothe because maybe his screen time usage has been since he was two,
you know, depending on who the kid is, right. And if kids have been raised, you know, digital
immigrants, I'm sorry, digital natives, we are digital immigrants, but digital natives,
people born into this digital world, oftentimes have been so used to having no sense of boredom,
because they never have boredom, because they

always have a screen, they have a hard time tolerating that. And of course, you take boredom
away, you take creativity away, take self exploration away, and self awareness away. So it's
important to have some of that downtime, to be bored to have your thoughts. So anyways, I would
encourage you to get one of those programs, work it out and work out with him, make sure he has
some voice in the limits and boundaries, create opportunities for him to earn more screen time.
Notice I said earn, not just, you know, not bribery, like, hey, you're doing all these things,
you join the track team, you're, you know, doing all your homework, you have earned a little
extra time. But again, it's about earning and not about extortion. You also want to make sure
that it's something that is within reasonable grasp. If it's too hard to do it, then, you know,
he gets deflated. Anyways, it's a big topic. I have sessions upon sessions talking about this,
so we're only doing a little bit of time here. But thank

you for your question. If you'd like me to answer your questions here on Tips on Teens, email
us at tipsonteens at teentherapycenter .com or direct messages right here on Facebook. We
love your questions. Also, you can join our Facebook group, Tips on Teens, and you can post the
questions there as well. Again, my name is Kent Toussaint with Teen Therapy Center and Child
and Teen Counseling, and I'll see you guys all next week. Bye bye.

How does YOUR kid fit in?

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"Ask Kent" at CBS Morning News

Our Clinical Director, Kent Toussaint, appeared on his ongoing segment “Ask Kent” at CBS Morning News.  Kent answered questions from parents about REAL parenting issues.

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Check out our sister, non-profit organization, Child & Teen Counseling for services on a sliding scale!